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Archive for the ‘Webinar’ Category

Build a Great website – Tutorial

Friday, April 17th, 2015

Seattle Website Tutorial

Recently Ed Perkins and Lance McBride held a weekend tutorial at Microsoft on building a website, with an emphasis on IEEE sites, using WordPress.  Ed also presented vTools.

Here are links to the videos/presentations stored at Microsoft Research:

Session 1 – Fundamentals  – Basic WordPress interface and structure, Templates, Calendar

Session 2 – Intermediate – Metatags, Plugins, vTools Calendar, Forms, Surveys, Promo Images, Redirections, eCommerce

Session 3 – IEEE vTools

Thanks to the Seattle Section for hosting this event.

 

Webinar – A Probe for Measurement – part of Blue Marvel Sereis

Tuesday, December 3rd, 2013

In a collaboration of the US National Science Foundation, the IEEE and the Group on Earth Observations, the NSF-funded Ocean Research Collaboration Network is proud to announce the next webinar in the series “Blue Marvel – Ocean Mysteries” will be “A Probe for Measurement and Sampling of Pristine Subglacial Lake Ellsworth Antarctica” with Matt Mowlem, head of the Ocean Technology and Engineering Group UK National Oceanography Centre.

The webinar will be broadcast Thursday, December 12, 2013 11:00 AM EST (8:00 AM PST).
Register for the seminar at www.oceanmysteries.net. Registration is required. There is no charge.

Abstract:

A Probe for Measurement and Sampling of Pristine Subglacial Lake Ellsworth Antarctica

In the field season 2012-2013, a consortium of U.K. engineers and scientists attempted, but failed, to access Subglacial Lake Ellsworth in West Antarctica.

This talk describes the technology developed to measure and sample the lake without introducing contamination into this pristine environment. Initial results show that the probe was sterile and still functioned following transport to the field site and back to the U.K.

The probe, rated for depths of 3200 meters, includes gas-tight water samplers, particle samplers, cameras, sonars, and sensors for conductivity, temperature, pH, Eh (reduction potential), and dissolved oxygen.

The key engineering challenges and their solution will be described. These include: development of systems that could be cleaned and sterilised; maintaining sterility in transport and deployment; and surviving freeze-thaw processes.

Speaker:

Dr. Matt Mowlem is the head of the Ocean Technology and Engineering Group at the National Oceanography Centre UK. His research focuses on the development of novel biogeochemical sensors, with an emphasis on low cost in situ systems, primarily for marine applications. He heads numerous UK, European and industry funded research projects developing lab-on-a-chip sensors for chemical, nucleic acid and microbiology targets. He also led a team of engineers and scientists to develop the sterile submersible probe technology for the measurement and sampling of pristine Subglacial Lake Ellsworth which resides beneath 3200 meters of ice in West Antarctica.

 

Webinar – A Century of Discovery – part of Blue Marvel Series

Saturday, September 7th, 2013

In a collaboration of the US National Science Foundation, the IEEE and the Group on Earth Observations, the NSF-funded Ocean Research Collaboration Network is proud to announce the next webinar in the series “Blue Marvel – Ocean Mysteries” will be “A Century of Discovery” by Gwyn Griffiths, lately chief technologist at the UK National Oceanography Centre.

The webinar will be broadcast Tuesday, September 10, 2013 1:00 PM EDT (10:00 AM PDT).
Register for the seminar at www.oceanmysteries.net. Registration is required. There is no charge.

Abstract:

A Century of Discovery: How Three Research Ships Named “Discovery” Unveiled the Ocean’s Mysteries

Concern over the effects that oceans and people have on one another may seem rather modern.

Not so.

In September 1925, the Royal Research Ship Discovery sailed for the Southern Ocean to investigate over-fishing of whales. The expedition had two imperatives, one economic and the other ecological: To find a way to preserve revenues from whaling factory-ship licences, and to preserve the whales from extinction.

For more than 25 years, using some apparatus that changed little and other apparatus that grew in sophistication, the “Discovery Investigations” contributed enormously to our knowledge of the biology, physics and chemistry of the Southern Ocean.

The facilities provided by the purpose-designed Discovery II (1929 to 1961) evolved slowly, but a third RRS Discovery, commissioned in 1962, transformed the UK’s capability for deep-sea oceanography. In service until 2012, she provided a floating laboratory and a delivery system for deploying instruments—including, perhaps most impressively, the array that has spanned the Atlantic since 2004 to measure the thermohaline circulation, of critical importance to the climate of Western Europe. This key transport mechanism has shown a great deal of variability at seasonal and shorter timescales, casting doubt over conclusions drawn from sporadic ship observations alone—demonstrating yet again the perils of infringing Nyquist’s sampling theorem. The latest Discovery also helped pioneer the next phase of ocean research, serving as mother ship for robotic vehicles that probe the deeps beneath the surface and the air above.

The absolute necessity of maintaining a modern, capable research vessel fleet convinced the UK government to build a new Discovery for the 21st century. Entering service in 2014, she will provide a platform for ocean science for the next 50 years.

Speaker:

Gwyn Griffiths was, until 2012, Chief Technologist at the UK’s National Oceanography Centre. Six weeks after joining the Institute of Oceanographic Sciences in 1976, he first sailed on the Royal Research Ship Discovery as an instrumentation engineer. His early research focused on measurement of ocean currents using electromagnetic and acoustic Doppler instruments. Then,  in 1993, he assumed responsibility for driving forward the Autosub programme, developing autonomous underwater vehicles. He has a passionate interest in the history of the development of oceanography, and a particular interest in ships that, since 1602, have carried the name Discovery. Griffiths is now a consultant in autonomous ocean systems.

 

Webinar – An Ocean of Data – part of “Blue Marvel” Series

Monday, June 17th, 2013

In a collaboration of the US National Science Foundation, the IEEE and the Group on Earth Observations, the NSF-funded Ocean Research Collaboration Network is proud to announce the next webinar in the series “Blue Marvel – Ocean Mysteries” will be “An Ocean of Data” by Simon Allen, CSIRO, Australia.

The webinar will be broadcast Tuesday, June 25 2013 23:00 UTC (7PM EDT, 4PT PDT; 9AM Sydney 26 June).
Register for the seminar at www.oceanmysteries.net. Registration is required. There is no charge.

Abstract:
Simon will present a review of future approaches to marine data collection, discovery and visualization options. For this, he will look at new technologies and why despite the data deluge we just cannot find the data we are looking for in the ocean, let alone visualize it. The talk will move us in from the deep ocean into the coastal zone which is under pressure from the 37% of the global population that live in the coastal strip (<100km from the coast). Simon will look at the problems associated with data collection and critically assess our ability to monitor change in this high energy, highly modified coastal environment.

Speaker:
Simon Allen is a research leader with the Australian Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO), where he specializes in “understanding our coastal systems.” Simon first went to sea as a “deckie learner” on a trawler at the age of fourteen, joined the Navy as a Seaman Officer at 18 and embarked on career as a non-military hydrographer at the age of 24. After fifteen years mapping and building offshore oilfields, Simon moved to Australia in 2004 working for CSIRO Marine Research Division. From 2007 to 2012 Simon was Technical Director for Australia’s Integrated Marine Observing System (IMOS) during which time he was awarded the Marine Technology Society International Award. In 2012, Simon changed his focus to the coast and now sends his research time examining better ways to observe our coastal waters.

Webinar – Microbial Oceanography – part of “Blue Marvel” Series

Friday, May 17th, 2013

In a collaboration of the US National Science Foundation, the IEEE and the Group on Earth Observations, the NSF-funded Ocean Research Collaboration Network is proud to announce the next webinar in the series “Blue Marvel – Ocean Mysteries” will be “Microbial Oceanography – Potential and Challenge” by Levente Bodrossy, CSIRO, Australia.

The webinar will be broadcast Tuesday, May 21 2013 23:00 UTC (7PM EDT, 4PT PDT; 9AM Sydney 22 May).
Register for the seminar at www.oceanmysteries.net. There is no charge.

“Microbial Oceanography – Potential and Challenge” by Levente Bodrossy, CSIRO Marine and Atmospheric Research, Australia

Abstract:
Microbial life is the basis for all other life on Earth. Microbes drive the vast majority of the biogeochemical cycles, provide essential nutrients for photosynthesis and keep the environment habitable against mankind’s best pollution efforts. Microbes make up more than 90% of the oceans’ biomass and turn over the entire marine carbon pool every month. They are the main players in the production and consumption of greenhouse gases and thus mankind’s best chance to mitigate global warming.

Though we still know almost nothing about the microbial world, recent developments in molecular methods for microbial ecology make it practicable to start to analyze microbial communities at their real complexities.

This talk will review today’s affordable, high-throughput molecular methods, summarize remote sampling and archiving options, note active large-scale microbial observatory programs, and anticipate future avenues of inquiry.

Speaker:
Levente Bodrossy is an OCE Fellow and Science Leader of the Environmental Genomics Team at CSIRO Marine and Atmospheric Research in Hobart, Tasmania. His current research focuses on the understanding of the interactions between the marine microbiota and the marine environment, including biogeochemical cycles and microbial ecology. A key step towards this understanding is the development and application of highly affordable molecular methods for the high throughput and high resolution analysis of the composition of marine microbial communities.